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Megalopolis is a Roman Epic fable set in an imagined Modern America. The City of New Rome must change, causing conflict between Cesar Catilina, a genius artist who seeks to leap into a utopian, idealistic future, and his opposition, Mayor Franklyn Cicero, who remains committed to a regressive status quo, perpetuating greed, special interests, and partisan warfare. Torn between them is socialite Julia Cicero, the mayor’s daughter, whose love for Cesar has divided her loyalties, forcing her to discover what she truly believes humanity deserves. (Cannes Film Festival)

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IviDvo 

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inglés Francis Ford Coppola's Megalopolis brings us to a futuristic, decadent and antiquely stylized New York, New Rome. I found this combination of ancient culture (clothes, names, entertainment) with a futuristic vision of the world very appealing, and the entire film is punctuated with quotes from ancient thinkers, which only underscore their timelessness in how they still apply to today. They highlight the absurdity of certain aspects of modern times, especially the fact that we are still the same people (animals) as in the days of ancient Rome, we are just playing at being a civilized and advanced society. This is portrayed brilliantly in the film, but that's probably the end of all the pros of this "masterpiece". I should also mention that although my favourite of the entire cast is Adam Driver (who was excellent as usual), the biggest praise should go to Shia LaBeouf, who once again shows something completely new, and proves that he can still surprise. Megalopolis had a lot of potential, a lot of great ideas that deserved to be fleshed out more. The huge disappointment for me was that the main character may have the power to stop time, but he doesn't make any use of it, I thought that would have been much more meaningful or impactful to the development of the film. As it is, the whole thing just comes across as a critique of society hoping for a brighter tomorrow, coupled with a simple family drama without much transcendence, which I find very insufficient. At the end of the film, I wondered if I had accidentally fallen asleep during the screening, that I must have missed something... Or maybe I just didn't understand the whole thing. [Festival de Cannes 2024] ()

POMO 

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inglés An ancient drama set in a futuristic New York with literary quotes from classics and existential contemplations, ridiculously incongruent with the film’s overall execution. It’s sexy once and funny once, but in its aesthetics, the rest of the film is a mix of styles ranging from embarrassing to kitschy, making it absolutely unsellable to a broader audience. Crowd scenes with dozens of extras, costumes with motifs from ancient Rome and digital scenes out of a television fantasy for retirement homes. The groundless, half-baked motif of stopping time and many other outlined ideas go nowhere. Is it possible that Coppola would consider this to be his great final work to which he gave his all? Just as he kicked his career into high gear with the long wedding scene in The Godfather, he lays it to rest with this horrible theatrical event for the cream of Megalopolis like something out of the mega-flop Caligula. Otherwise, Nathalie Emmanuel is beautiful, Aubrey Plaza is dangerously seductive and Shia LaBeouf is the best of them all. [Cannes FF] ()

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